Hiroshima buildings that survived atomic bomb to be demolished

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Above Image caption A Google street view picture with a warning that the building is not earthquake safe

The Japanese city of Hiroshima plans to knock down two buildings that survived the 1945 atomic bomb – but some locals want them preserved as landmarks.

The two blocks – built in 1913 – were first used as a military clothing factory, and later as university student accommodation.

They were also used as a makeshift hospital after the bomb itself.

“They could be used as facilities toward (promoting) the abolition of nuclear weapons,” said one survivor.

Around 80,000 people were killed as a direct result of the bomb, and another 35,000 were injured.

The attack flattened most of the city, and – as of last year – only 85 buildings built before the bomb remained within five kilometres of “ground zero”.

The blocks survived, at least partly because they were made from reinforced concrete. Some bomb damage to the metal windows and doors is still visible.

In 2017, authorities found the structures – now publicly-owned – were highly likely to collapse in a strong earthquake.

And – as the buildings are not in use, and are not open to the public – the local government decided they should be demolished by 2022.

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